Aberdeen Built Ships

This project was one of several initiated at the fully-online Code the City 19 History and Data event.

It’s purpose is to gather data on Aberdeen-built ships, with the permission of the site’s owners, and to push that refined bulk data, with added structure, onto Wikidata as open data, with links back to the Aberdeen Ships site through using a new identifier.

By adding the data for the Aberdeen Built Ships to Wikidata we will be able to do several things including

  • Create a timeline of ship building
  • Create maps, charts and graphs of the data (e.g. showing the change in sizes and types of ships over time
  • Show the relative activity of the many shipbuilders and how that changed
  • Link ship data to external data sources
  • Improve the data quality
  • Increase engagement with the ships database.

The description below is largely borrowed from the ReadMe file of the project’s Github Repo.

Progress to date

So far the following has been accomplished, mainly during the course of the weekend.

Next Steps?

To complete the project the following needs to be done

  • Ensure that the request for an identifier for ABS is created for use by us in adding ships to Wikidata. A request to create an identifier for Aberdeen Ships is currently pending.
  • Create Wikidata entities for all shipbuilders and note the QID for each. We’ve already loaded nine of these into WikiData.
  • Decide on how to deal with the list of ships that MAY be already in Wikidata. This may have to be a manual process. Think about how we reconcile this – name / year / tonnage may all be useful.
  • Decide on best route to bulk upload – eg Quickstatements. This may be useful: Wikidata Import Guide
  • Agree a core set of data for each ship that will parsed from ships.json to be added to Wikidata – e.g. name, year, builder, tonnage, length etc
  • Create a script to output text that can be dropped into a CSV or other file to be used by QuickStatements (assuming that to be the right tool) for bulk input ensuring links for shipbuilder IDs and ABS identifiers are used.

We will also be looking to get pictures of the ships published onto Wiki Commons with permissive licences, link these to the Wiki Data and increase and improve the number of Wikipedia articles on Aberdeen Ships in the longer-term.

Header Image of a Scale Model of Thermopylae at Aberdeen Maritime Museum By Stephencdickson – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0

Aberdeen Harbour Board Arrivals Transcription Project

A blog post by Mollie Horne, Project Archivist at Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives and Ian Watt of Code The City.

The arrivals transcription project is an ongoing partnership between Code the City and Aberdeen City & Aberdeenshire Archives. It forms part of a wider project funded by the Archives Revealed initiative funded by The National Archives which aims to improve the accessibility of records.

The arrival registers are a small part of a much larger collection which was transferred to Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives as a result of a partnership with the Aberdeen Harbour Board.

The project was originally intended to be part of the physical Code the City 19 event in April 2020 but in anticipation of the nationwide restrictions, it was decided to move entirely online. In the week before we were told to work from home, Mollie photographed each individual page (all 649 of them) from the arrival registers from 1914-1920 and uploaded them to the Google Sheets system which had been set up by Ian. This meant that we had a large amount of material which could be worked on for an extended period.

After creating a set of guidelines and helpful links, we invited the public to work on transcribing and checking entries from March 27th onwards. As the online CTC19 event was scheduled for 11-12th April this allowed us two weeks to create enough data to be useful to the coders over the official weekend.

Transcribers accessed two Google sheets. The first was to log their participation and note what photograph they were transcribing.

The second sheet was the one into which they transcribed the data.

Example of 1916 transcription
Example of 1916 transcription

We also set up an open Slack group where transcribers could chat, ask questions, get help etc.

Progress was rapid: by the end of the weekend almost 4,000 records had been transcribed and checked. At the time of writing (2nd May 2020) that has now grown to over 7,000 records transcribed.

When an image has been transcribed, and checked, we lock off the entries to preserve them form change.

The data which had been transcribed was used to create a website, set up by Andrew Sage of CTC, where we could see information in a collated an organised way – this was extremely useful to inform other transcriptions. So far we have managed to fully complete 1914 and are working through the rest of the years.

The arrivals transcription project started as a great way to highlight an important time in the history of the Harbour, which has always been a big part of Aberdeen. However, given current circumstances, it has also become a great opportunity to give people something to focus on.

The project remains open – and you can still get involved by contributing just an hour or two of your time. Start here.