Close-up of lavalamps

SODU2020 – a guest post by Sarah Roberts of Swirrl

Scottish Open Data Unconference

It’s all going on in Scotland in March. As we spring into Spring (nearly there!), we’re very excited to be sponsoring, and going, to the Scottish Open Data Unconference in Aberdeen on 14th and 15th March. Topics are pitched in the morning of each day, an agenda is created and participants talk as much as the chair. 

Our colleague Jamie Whyte is lucky enough to have a ticket, so if you spot him do say hi! Here are some recent open data happenings we’ve picked up on our radar…

Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation was released late January and we loved the accompanying briefing document, which put the numbers into context (find it here). The data’s also available on the Scottish Government’s Open Data site, where you can use the Atlas section to find key data zones and see key facts about them. The below screenshot is of the data zone which is ranked as the most deprived in the 2020 SIMD.

SIMD - Greenock Town centre
SIMD – Greenock Town centre

People are already making stuff with the data — below is a screenshot of Jamie’s lava lamp visualisation of the data

Commentary, explanation and analysis from others include: Alasdair Rae’s summary matrix of the SIMD data by council area, a story graphic of the data, an interactive mapping tool, an analysis blog post from Scottish parliament information centre and news articles, like this one from the BBC.

Jamie Whyte - King of the Lava Lamp
Jamie Whyte – King of the Lava Lamp image

W3C Community Group

Another thing we’ve noticed is that there’s preliminary work happening on GraphQL and RDF, which aims to serve as a case for future standardisation. More on this here, where you can send a request to join the group if this is your bag. It’s definitely ours! 

Collaborative work with data

Last, but not least, collaboration. This is a wide concept but it’s also a trend that’s cropping up in different aspects of working with open data. Here are some we’ve noticed:

“promote trust and co-operation between government and civil society.”

  • The Office for National Statistics is publishing data in a collaborative project across a spread of organisations including ONS, HMRC, MHCLG, DWP and DIT. The Connected Open Government Statistics (COGS) project involves a lot of technical collaborative work in harmonising codelists, as well as harmonising a data model and all the processes that go into it. More on this project here on the GSS blog site. 
  • 2019 saw a growing, collaborative API community, with API events involving government and people working with government. We went to one in Newcastle and another one’s arranged for March 16th (if you’re still hungry for more after the unconference!) 
  • The Open Data Institute have been busy, busy, busy. Jeni Tennison spoke about the idea of how collaboration is key for new institutions of the data age, at our Power of Data conference in October (catch that video here). The ODI have also been working on a data and public services toolkit & there’s an introductory event to this in Edinburgh just a few days before the Scottish Open Data Unconference. 

Thanks for reading! If you’d like to find out a bit more about who we are and what we do, take a look at our website, our blog, our latest newsletter and / or our twitter stream. We’ve just been named as one of the FT1000 fastest growing companies in Europe and we’re still hiring, so if you think you can help us we’d love to hear from you. 

We love data and we’re delighted to be sponsoring the Scottish Open Data Unconference. See you there. 

 

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